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Muriel taylor scholarship fund for cellists

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TEL. +44 (0)20 7928 9251                                                                          EMAIL.info@murieltaylorscholarship.org

Founder: Nannie Jamieson

Chairman: Ross Pople

Charity number: 263232

 

Muriel was born in England, but was raised from an early age in Canada and throughout her life retained a great love for that country.  

She came back to England in her late teens to study with Herbert Walenn at the London Cello School and, later, with Feuermann in Switzerland and Mainardi in Berlin.  She was much influenced in her work by Max Rostal and Yehudi Menuhin.

 

She always had a deep love of chamber music and in 1939 Muriel, Robert Masters, Nannie Jamieson and Ronald Kinloch Anderson met at Dartington Hall to form a piano quartet,  which became internationally known as the Robert Masters Quartet.  From 1955 she was a much sought-after, admired and beloved professor at the Royal Academy of Music.    

 

Tragically she fell victim to leukaemia, facing even death with humour, quiet courage and making the very best use of the time left to her.  She died in 1971 and the first of the annual competitions took place in 1972.

 

Her  work  continues and her spirit lives on.  There are 48 young, exceptionally talented cellists who have been awarded the Muriel Taylor Scholarship since 1972, all between the ages of 17 and 23.  The prize  enables students to  widen their horizons, reflecting Muriel’s ethos as a musician and an indomitable spirit.  

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MURIEL TAYLOR F.R.A.M

 

 

Muriel Taylor was an exceptional person. Simplicity, integrity, musical talent, a complete dedication to the art of ‘cello playing and to her students - all these qualities she possessed in abundance.  More than that, she was a compassionate and humane woman, with a keen sense of humour, full of life and fun.

 

Inspired by her lifelong friend, the late Nannie Jamieson, her friends founded a scholarship to honour her memory and enable talented young cellists to bloom at a critical stage in their careers.

 

 

 

She always had a deep love of chamber music and in 1939 Muriel, Robert Masters, Nannie Jamieson and Ronald Kinloch Anderson met at Dartington Hall to form a piano quartet,  which became internationally known as the Robert Masters Quartet.  From 1955 she was a much sought-after, admired and beloved professor at the Royal Academy of Music.    

 

Tragically she fell victim to leukaemia, facing even death with humour, quiet courage and making the very best use of the time left to her.  She died in 1971 and the first of the annual competitions took place in 1972.

 

Her  work  continues and her spirit lives on.  There are 48 young, exceptionally talented cellists who have been awarded the Muriel Taylor Scholarship since 1972, all between the ages of 17 and 23.  The prize  enables students to  widen their horizons, reflecting Muriel’s ethos as a musician and an indomitable spirit.  

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